18 July 2013: Questions to the Department of Children and Youth Affairs, for answer before the meeting of the Committee on Health and Children.

Question 4: National Substance Misuse Strategy

Question 5: Implementation plan for the Child and Family Support Agency

Question 6: Oberstown campus development

Question 4: National Substance Misuse Strategy.

To ask Minister for Children and Youth Affairs to outline her position on the recommendations contained in the Steering Group Report on a National Substance Misuse Strategy on protecting children and young people from the impact of alcohol. Specifically, the recommendations relating to alcohol marketing and minimum pricing with a view to impacting on the age at which young people start drinking alcohol, as well as the consumption levels of under18s.

Children and Alcohol
Whilst there have been some indicators showing an improvement in the levels of alcohol consumption in children over the last decade, with the percentage of children aged 10-17 who report never having had an alcoholic drink increased from approximately 40% in 2002 to 54% in 2010, there are many more indicators that continue to give deep concern about the patterns of drinking that exist in children and young people.

Drunkenness amongst Irish Young people
There exists a consistent trend for drunkenness when drinking among Irish young people, a trend that sets them apart from the majority of their European counterparts.
In the latest report on drinking among 15 and 16-year-olds across Europe, Irish students reported drinking a third more on their latest drinking day than the European average. In addition, there also exists a trend whereby Irish girls drink as much as boys, and sometimes drink more. Irish students reported that, in the 30 days prior to the survey
• Half (48% boys and 52% girls) had drunk alcohol
• 40% had 5+ drinks on a single drinking occasion
• 23% had one or more episodes of drunkenness
• In 2010, 18.3% of children aged 10-17 reported that they had been drunk at least once in the last 30 days.
Unfortunately, the impact of the trend in drunkenness has already surfaced as chronic alcohol-related conditions among young people become increasingly common.
Between 2005 and 2008, 4,129 people aged under 30 were discharged from hospital with chronic diseases or conditions of the type normally seen in older people.There has also been a considerable increase in alcoholic liver disease (ALD) among younger age groups. Among 15 to 34-years-olds, the rate of ALD discharges increased by 275% between 1995 and 2009
The accompanying trend of increased ease of access to alcohol is also a source of concern. In 2011, 84% Irish 15 and 16-year-olds reported that alcohol was “very easy” or “fairly easy” to get compared to 75% in 2007. Just over a quarter (26%) said they had bought drink for their own consumption from the off-trade in the 30 days prior to the survey; 37% said they had bought their drink from an on-trade outlet.
This trend has been accompanied by an explosion in the number of outlets selling alcohol at ‘pocket money’ prices with a bottle of beer often cheaper than a bottle of water. Discounts on multiple packs of alcohol have created a culture where young people buy slabs of beer instead of six-packs.
Unsocial and Public Order Offences by Children and Young People‘Public Order and other Social Code Offences’ were the single highest cause of referrals to the Garda Juvenile Diversion Programme, representing 28.9% of all referrals. Many of these are associated with alcohol consumption and binge drinking amongst young people.
The effects of Alcohol Abuse by Adults on Children
There are serious consequences also to children living in families where one of the parents or carers has an alcohol misuse problem. Adult alcohol problems are directly responsible for a significant percentage of child abuse and neglect cases; was identified as a risk factor in three-quarters of Irish teenagers for whom social workers applied for special care; is associated with a range of disorders known as foetal alcohol spectrum disorders are caused by mothers drinking alcohol in pregnancy
In Conclusion

The Department of Children and Youth Affairs works closely with the Department of Health to identify and support actions supported by emerging international evidence on what is effective in helping reduce the current levels of alcohol misuse in Ireland. Actions on pricing, advertising, sponsorship, labelling and others will move us further down the road of achieving safer levels of alcohol consumption in adults and minimising or preventing consumption by children.

Question 5: Implementation plan for the Child and Family Support Agency

To ask the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs to share with the Joint Committee on Health and Children the Implementation Plan for the new Child and Family [Support] Agency including: the anticipated commencement date for the Agency; details of the exact number and disciplines of the staff who will be transferred from the NEWB, Family Resource Centres and HSE; and a clear explanation of the referral pathways for children and families to the new Agency.

As I stated in response to the Deputy’s questions on this subject in advance of the April meeting, the establishment of the Child and Family Agency is at the heart of the Government’s reform of child and family services.

Extensive work is ongoing in the Departments of Children and Youth Affairs and Health, and in the HSE to prepare for the establishment of the Child and Family Agency. The preparations are designed to allow for the Agency to assume full statutory responsibility for specific services for children and families upon establishment.

The Child and Family Agency Bill was published on 12th July last and it is the intention to introduce it to the Houses of the Oireachtas in the current session. A precise target date for establishment of the Agency will be set when consideration of the legislation is advanced.

The Bill focuses on the task of bringing together the functions of the three “source” agencies (the HSE, the Family Support Agency and the National Educational Welfare Board). Particular care is required in respect of the disaggregation of the functions from the HSE to ensure that there are no unintended consequences (for either the Agency or the Directorates remaining within the HSE framework) in the separation of functions, either in legal terms, or in terms of the practical operation of day-do-day services for children and their families or HSE clients across the life cycle.

A key task in drafting the legislation has been to ensure that the Agency operates within a strong framework of public accountability. Other important features of the legislation relate to the need to create the correct platform for interagency arrangements, shared service arrangements and a robust process for the commissioning of services from a range of providers.

In addition to creating a framework for the future, the Bill also has to take account of the transitional arrangements which inevitably have to be prescribed. These are potentially complex against the backdrop of changing governance and structural arrangements in the context of the wider Health Reform programme.

While the legislative process is under way, all necessary organisational preparations are continuing in parallel. It is important not to underestimate the scale of change involved and the absolute necessity for a carefully planned approach to be adopted while embarking upon such large-scale change within this crucial area of the public service.

The establishment of the Agency is being directed by a project team (led by the CEO Designate) which is driving the overall project plan. Its responsibilities include the full range of activities required to bring the project to completion – from the high level legislative programme elements through to the more practical day-to-day issues regarding the transfers of staff, systems and various undertakings relevant to the operation of the new Agency. Representatives of the Family Support Agency and the National Educational Welfare Board are also members of the team and are actively involved in leading the requisite change management programmes within those agencies.

The project team reports to an Oversight Group which is chaired by the Secretary General of the Department of Children and Youth Affairs and relevant matters are escalated to the Oversight Group if necessary. Its membership includes officials of the Departments of Children and Youth Affairs, Health and Public Expenditure and Reform; the HSE – both sides of the organisation; and the CEO Designate of the Child and Family Agency.

In order to prepare for the establishment of the new Agency, a due diligence exercise has been commissioned regarding the level of resources to transfer from the HSE to the CFA on establishment. The objective of the exercise is to establish that the level of resources to be divested from the HSE to the new Agency is fair and reasonable.

Following intensive work on the part of HSE and CFA-designated staff, individual letters of notification issued earlier this year to some 4000 staff that have been confirmed as transferring to the new Agency. This includes staff employed by the HSE (the majority currently working in Children and Family Services), the Family Support Agency (FSA) and the National Educational Welfare Board (NEWB). It should be noted that the staff of the Family Resource Centres are not employed by the Family Support Agency directly.

I am confident that the establishment of the Agency will bring a dedicated focus to child protection, family support and other key children’s services for the first time in the history of the State and will in time contribute to the transformation of what are essential services for families and communities. As can be seen from the above, following publication of the Report of the Task Force on the Child and Family Support Agency, intensive work has been underway to prepare for establishment of the Agency. There are strong project governance and project planning methodologies in place, with revisions on an ongoing basis as tasks are accomplished or issues escalated. Further details of the tasks undertaken or underway were set out in my April reply.

In addition, since April my Department has sought expressions of interest for the Family Support Agency board which will form a shadow board pending the legal establishment under the Child and Family Agency Bill which has now been published.

In respect of referral pathways, HSE Children and Family Services are piloting programmes in selected geographical areas to ensure the most effective response to all referrals. Currently, all child welfare and protection referrals are channelled through social work departments, where child protection is prioritised. The revised referral pathways are intended to ensure a service is provided for all referrals at a level that is most appropriate to the problem presented. The intention is that the lessons learned from the early roll-out of this method of dealing with referrals will be applied across the country.

Question 6: Oberstown campus development

To ask the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs when a single management structure will be in situ in Oberstown to oversee the development of the campus including the integration of the three existing schools, and to outline, including the timeframe, the remaining steps in the process to ending the practice of detention of children in St Patrick’s Institution by mid-2014.

As previously stated in response to various Parliamentary Questions, we are the first Government to:

• have ended the detention of 16 year olds in St Patrick’s Institution.
• provide capital funding, of €50 million, for the development of National Child Detention Facilities in Oberstown.
• have extended the remit of the Ombudsman for Children to include St Patrick’s Institution.
• have established a dedicated multidisciplinary assessment and therapeutic care team for children in detention and special care.
• revised campus rosters and management structures at Oberstown.
• moved to close St Patrick’s Institution.

With respect to the development of National Child Detention Facilities in Oberstown, this project is required in order to give effect to the Programme for Government commitment to end the practice of detaining children in adult prison facilities. My officials have, in conjunction with the Office of Public Works, completed the design process and secured planning permission for the capital development. The tender process is being managed by the Office of Public Works at present and an announcement on the outcome of this process will be made shortly. The project will result in an increase in the overall detention capacity on the campus from 52 places at present to 90 places in total, along with associated education, visiting and other facilities. The required capacity to enable the assignment of responsibility for all children under the age of 18 years to the Oberstown campus is to be delivered in the first phase of the project, by mid 2014.

There is legal provision under the Children Act 2001 for 24 male bed spaces in Trinity House School, 8 female bed spaces in Oberstown Girls School, and 20 male bed spaces in Oberstown Boys School. However, only 16 of the certified 24 male bed spaces in Trinity House School are currently available for use due to staffing issues. The Irish Youth Justice Service, which is based in my Department, is currently in discussions with management and staff on the Oberstown campus to reconfigure staffing and accommodation in order to meet the increased demand for male bed places from the courts. I have also noted a substantial increase in demand for male bed spaces on the Oberstown campus in 2013 compared to 2012. This has been primarily but not exclusively driven by an increase in the number of boys aged 16 years old on admission detained in Oberstown. The Irish Youth Justice Service has identified a trend since late 2012 of a higher number of such children being detained in Oberstown compared to the situation which applied when this age group was the responsibility of St Patrick’s Institution. This increase in demand from the courts merits further consideration, particularly since the Central Statistics Office has recently recorded a general reduction in crime trends overall in the community.

The first-ever campus-wide staffing roster, with a set of harmonised conditions for hours worked, was implemented on 25th February 2013 following protracted negotiation and agreement between staff and management at the Labour Relations Commission. I wish to acknowledge the cooperation of staff with the implementation of the LRC agreement to date. A number of outstanding issues are the subject of ongoing discussions in conjunction with implementation of the campus wide roster, the ongoing industrial relations process on the campus and the Haddington Road Agreement.

I have obtained Government approval for an amendment to the Children Act, 2001. The Bill includes an enabling provision which will allow for the merging of the three current children detention schools into one single cohesive organisation. The Bill is at drafting stage at present with Parliamentary Counsel and it is my aim to bring it to the House later in 2013. This will ensure that a single unified management structure is in place and fully operational when the proposed new development on the campus is completed. In the interim my Officials are making arrangements for the appointment of a campus manager to drive the change management programme in Oberstown. The arrangements for the recruitment and appointment of this manager will be made in the coming weeks, in conjunction with the Public Appointments Service (PAS). It should be noted that the existing Board of Management has responsibilities in relation to each of the three schools.

Since taking over responsibility for the children detention schools, I have also engaged fully with the HSE on the implementation of a new mental health service for children in detention and in the special care / high support system. This is known as the Assessment, Consultation and Therapy Service (ACTS). Good progress has been made and the posts for addiction counsellor and speech and language therapist have been filled with the psychology post due to be filled in September, 2013. Representatives from the children detention schools, HSE and IYJS have been working together over the last two months to identify an appropriate mental health screening system that can be used in the children detention schools and to develop training for staff. Training is due to take place in September 2013 with a view to implementing mental health screening for all young people in the detention system before the end of December 2013. I welcome the ongoing development of this important service on the Oberstown campus, which was a key recommendation of the Ryan Commission on child abuse of 2009.

In conclusion, a very substantial change programme is underway on the Oberstown campus. Oberstown’s expanded remit will see it accommodate all children detained in the State in a child specific environment from the middle of next year. The Government has provided dedicated capital funds for this purpose. I recognise that significant operational change is also required. Major change has already been achieved and my Department continues to work with the Board of Management, the staff and their representatives to expand the range and quality of services on the campus.

Statements on Budget 2014

 

Seanad Éireann

Statements on Budget 2014

Minister of State for Public Service Reform and the Office of Public Works, Brian Hayes TD

Speaking Notes

Tuesday 15 October 2014

[CHECK AGAINST DELIVERY]

 

Senator Jillian van Turnhout: I welcome the Minister of State to the House. I will premise my statement by underscoring the importance of addressing today’s budgetary measures and fiscal adjustment, the sixth in line of extremely difficult budgets since 2008, and the context of their cumulative impact since this is the reality of the way they are being experienced by people.

As a Senator this is the third time I have made a statement on the budget and it is safe to say, and no doubt the feeling is shared by many members of the public, that my sense of disillusionment and powerlessness has been compounded on each occasion. It is a sense that nothing has changed about the way we do our business. I welcome what the Minister said about the European aspect but as far as we do our business, I do not believe anything has changed.

I have said on numerous occasions in previous statements on the budget and in response to various social welfare provisions that Ireland, while on the road to recovery, is still in serious financial difficulty and money must be saved and generated but how this money is saved, be it from cuts to existing provisions and services or exploring alternative revenue-generating measures such as tax increases and against whom the cuts are made, are ultimately political decisions. There is a strong public perception that the decision has been made to persistently target vulnerable groups and re-hit already stretched and hard-pressed families.

Accusations have been made that such decisions are made with political capital considerations in mind. There is a certain class of people that have remained largely unscathed by successive budgets. They are young employed individuals without children and without a mortgage. Effectively, that grouping has remained unscathed. I have spoken with many of those people in the course of my work and I have heard time and again that they are willing to shoulder their share of the burden more fairly. After each budget they are grateful they did not get hit.

I believe it is a mark of a decent and humane society to ensure that those with the lowest income and least resources are protected from further cuts. I recall when dealing in April 2012 with the impact of the provisions on lone parents in the Social Welfare and Pensions Bill 2012 feeling that anything I had to say was futile since the relevant decisions had already been made. It almost felt disingenuous to be kicking up a fuss knowing that whatever I said, nothing would change but I spoke to the groups advocating for lone parents on the ground and they convinced me of the importance of ensuring that their voices, and the voices of their constituents, made it on to the record.

The voices of civil society organisations and NGOs on the ground, which witness the impact of the decisions and cuts we debate in these Chambers, must be heard. We need to reconsider our mechanism leading up to the budget, to have a greater engagement with those organisations and not have a showpiece hearing where the relevant decision makers are not present. This is also why I feel so strongly about the move to restrict the access of the NGOs to the AV room to have political briefings. We need to be very careful about our decisions. We should not close off or close down dialogue and open ourselves to accusations that political decisions are being made in a vacuum.

Moving to today’s budget, I very much welcome the decisions made, particularly in the Department of Children and Youth Affairs, and the additional funding of €6.7 million in 2014 to reform child protection. I know that money will go to the new child and family agency. It is really positive that it is being moved into the Vote of the Department of Children and Youth Affairs. I am very concerned at the talk that the new agency will start with a deficit. The agency will be taken out of the HSE and created, and there is talk of transferring a deficit. That will be regressive and I will watch it closely.

I welcome the implementation of the preschool quality agenda for which there is funding of €4.5 million. Additional inspectors will be recruited. There should be nationwide coverage. I wholeheartedly endorse the idea of a preschool mentoring service. We need mentoring in that sector to bring quality up to a consistent level and not to see more scenes such as those we saw in the “Prime Time” programme entitled Breach of Trust. We need to support staff training.

I also welcome the initiatives to tackle child poverty at a local area level. A cut of €3 million in youth work funding was projected for 2014, and we are supposed to heave a sigh of relief that it is only €2 million. This sector has been disproportionately cut. We know that for every €1 the State invests in youth work it saves €2.22 in the long run. Youth work organisations around the country are under huge pressure. The youth council proposed the introduction of a 1% social responsibility levy on drinks manufacturers. I notice in the budget that €145 million is saved in the excise duty added to alcohol. Why can youth workers not receive some of that additional money? They do not take funding from drinks companies. All too often we hear it said of the sports organisations “Oh dear, they cannot afford to let go of the drink sponsorship”. Youth organisations say “No” to drinks companies because of the ethos of their organisations. They work with young people, as do the sports organisations. Youth organisations say “No” and I do not see why a measure like that cannot be found for them. I welcome and note the increase in tax on tobacco.

If one is in the 18 to 25 year age category one had no hand in creating the situation in which we now find ourselves yet there is a disproportionate reduction in the jobseeker’s allowance. That is very tough on young people. Yes, they should be encouraged into education and training but the reality is that the places are not available for them.

Minister Hayes: There is a 100% increase as announced today in the budget in places for that age cohort.

Senator van Turnhout: The places are not there. There is an urban-rural divide. I hear all too often that young people are being forced back into the family home. Once again, there is a geographical lottery.

On the tax exemption for starting one’s own business, does someone need to wait to be unemployed for over 15 months? We know most businesses do not make money in the first two years. I wonder what this measure solves.

It is great that the €14 million youth guarantee has been announced. I am however a little concerned about the figures and I will study this more closely. It seems very low. Much of this is based on the Swedish model but the Swedes estimated that it would cost €6,600 per participant. They estimate that it will cost €273 million to implement in Ireland, based on their figures. That is phased over several years but €14 million seems very low, given that we need to spend it before we recoup it from the EU. While it seems like a large sum it is too low to implement the youth guarantee as it is envisaged—–

Minister Hayes: Is it not matching?

Senator van Turnhout: No. The Government must spend it first then recoup it. That is why I am concerned about the €14 million because we must spend it before we recoup.

I warmly welcome the free GP cards for children aged five years and under but we must ask ourselves about the discretionary medical cards. What children will lose out? In the Irish Examiner there is a very good case study profiling some of the cases that have lost out. It is excellent to have a rights-based approach to introducing the free GP card and they should not be confused with one another. I am concerned about this and I am hearing these concerns from parents around the country. I welcome the grant for the protection of the homeless.

I am concerned about the tax credit for the one-parent family. I want to explore it further to see what implications it has for families. I hear that the mental health budget has been reduced. We never seem to be able to spend the money.

 Minister Hayes: It has been increased by €20 million.

Senator van Turnhout: I hear that the overseas development aid budget has been reduced by €14.1 million. I have a difficulty with the kind of society we are creating. I have voted for tax increases. I voted for property tax.

Minister Hayes: It is not enough.

Senator Darragh O’Brien: Some 3% on those over €100,000.

Senator van Turnhout: Senator Mary Ann O’Brien and I have put forward ways in which the Department of Health can save a significant amount of money on children with life-limiting conditions. The Minister of State should not talk to me about solutions. I keep putting them forward.

Minister Hayes: It is not enough.

Senator van Turnhout: I keep putting them forward. The Minister of State has not even taken one step in the right direction on that issue. I have concerns about maternity and adoptive benefit. I ask the Minister of State to look at my record. I have put down solutions in this House. I have tried to be fair and equal in what I have said. Some of the measures are hidden. These small cumulative cuts will affect people.

 

The Lancet

In July 2021, Jillian co-authored an article in the world-renowned medical journal “The Lancet”