Meeting Commissioner Vestager at Central Bank of Ireland

I had the great honour to meet and discuss a wide range of issues with European Commissioner for Competition, Margrethe Vestager, during her recent visit to Dublin. After our dinner, I presented her an award for her role in promoting Women in Leadership. The event was hosted in Dublin by European Movement Ireland, Sodexo Ireland, and the Central Bank of Ireland.

Click to see full picture.

Large picture: (l-r) Maurice Pratt, Jillian van Turnhout; Dr. Philip Lane, Governor of the Central Bank; Commissioner for Competition, Margrethe Vestager, Noelle O Connell, Executive Director of European Movement Ireland, Margot Slattery, Country President of Sodexo and Catherine Day.

Picture by Conor McCabe Photography.

Jillian van Turnhout awarded honorary fellowship

Yesterday, 12th October 2018, Jillian van Turnhout was awarded with the honorary fellowship of the Faculty of Paediatrics, the highest honour the faculty bestows.

It is conferred on individuals who have made outstanding contributions to the practice of paediatrics and also to individuals who have made significant contributions to improve the lives of children.

Dr Ellen Crushell, dean of the Faculty of Paediatrics, paid tribute to the new honorary fellows: “We are delighted to confer Honorary fellowship to four deserving candidates in recognition of their activities, advocacy and work for the benefit of children in our society.”

Jillian is joined by Joe Schmidt, a New Zealand-born rugby union coach – currently the head coach of Ireland, paediatric ophthalmologist, Professor Michael O’Keeffe and paediatric oncologist, Professor Sir Alan Craft.

Jillian van Turnhout commented upon receiving the award:

“I am chuffed to receive the tribute of an Honorary Fellowship by the Faculty of Paediatrics of the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland. It is “in recognition of your significant contribution to children’s health and wellbeing, through advocacy and in particular your work in the area of promoting children’s rights nationally and internationally.” It was a great honour to receive this award along side Dr Michael O’ Keeffe, Joe Schmidt, and Prof Sir Alan Craft.”

Jillian van Turnhout and the “Future of Europe” debate

Since November 2017, the Irish government held a series of public and sectoral meetings, hearing the views in person and on-line of members of the public and representative organisations. The intention is that the views expressed on Europe will provide an input into the Irish Government’s contribution to the broader “Future of Europe” debate. This process culminated in the National Citizens’ Dialogue on 9 May 2018 in Royal Hospital Kilmainham.

The European Movement Ireland supports the Department in organising these events. Jillian van Turnhout is a vice-chair of the European Movement Ireland and as such was participating in the National Citizens’ Dialogue on 9 May.

In the photo are Tanaiste Simon Coveney, Executive Director of the EMI Noelle O’Connell and Director of External Affairs EirGrid Group Rosemary Steen as well as Jillian van Turnhout.

Zappone appoints Jillian van Turnhout to monitor scouts

Article from The Irish Times, 1st May 2018

Minister says she will restore funding when assured governance at required standard

Minister for Children Katherine Zappone has appointed former senator Jillian van Turnhout to assess the implementation of Scouting Ireland’s governance reforms.

Ms Zappone informed the Dáil that “I have asked Jillian van Turnhout as an independent expert to examine this situation over the coming weeks”.

She said: “In accordance with her terms of reference she is being asked to provide me with a clear assessment of the adequacy of Scouting Ireland’s governance arrangements and to advise me on whether I can be assured about scouting Ireland governance and related matters.”

Ms van Turnhout, a former chief executive of the Children’s Rights Alliance and former chief commissioner of Irish Girl Guides, was appointed in the last few days, the Minister said.

She will work with the Minister to ensure the pledged reforms by Scouting Ireland of their governance process “are in the best interests” of the organisation.

This follows the controversy over the handling by senior members of the organisation of a rape complaint in 2016. Four senior volunteers have temporarily stood aside after they were criticised in a confidential review by child protection expert Ian Elliott.

Mr Elliott’s review led to the establishment of a barrister-led inquiry of the handling of the complaint, in which an adult volunteer in 2016 claimed she was raped by a male leader on a camping trip in 2009.

Ms Zappone said Scouting Ireland had pledged to implement all the recommendations of Mr Elliott’s report but “a lot of work” and action had to be completed and Ms van Turnhout will keep her informed about that implementation in the coming weeks.

Confidence

Labour’s Sean Sherlock asked if the Minister had full confidence in the process underway in Scouting Ireland and in relation to historical cases, following reports that a file had been sent to the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) over an alleged case of child sexual abuse during a scout camping trip in 2014, at Larch Hill, south Co Dublin by an active male leader in the organisation.

Mr Sherlock asked if there was “only one sample cases or are there other further complaints”.

He also asked the Minister when she would restore funding to the organisation and if she acknowledged the work of the thousands of volunteers in the organisation.

Mr Sherlock added that there “seems to be a disparity between what happens at the head of the organisation and the bottom of the organisation”.

Ms Zappone said that all her actions were guided by her “deep respect” for the volunteer ethos of the organisation.

She said she had funded Scouting Ireland until the end of June. They had received €430,000 this year in State funding. “Scouting Ireland have informed me that they have reserves,” she said.

But Ms Zappone said when she is assured “that I can accept their governance, at that point I will restore their funding”.

She said she had not seen Mr Elliott’s report and expected to receive his review with the inquiry report, which is due at the end of May. She said it would be useful if the report was published, but usually legal advice was necessary for this.

Jillian van Turnhout appointed to Governance Committee of WAGGGS

The World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS) is the largest voluntary movement dedicated to girls and young women in the world. The diverse Movement represents ten million girls and young women from 150 countries. For more than 100 years Girl Guiding and Girl Scouting has transformed the lives of girls and young women worldwide, supporting and empowering them to achieve their fullest potential and become responsible citizens of the world.

I was recently appointed to its GOVERNANCE COMMITTEE, the purpose of which is to evaluate and advance effective governance policies and practices at the global, regional and Member Organisation level:

  • Oversee all matters relating to Member Organisation constitutions and bye-laws and WAGGGS Constitution and Bye-Laws;
  • Apply knowledge of CIO regulations and responsibilities and of relevant UK Law to ensure compliance as well as strengthen WAGGGS’ current and future position;
  • Review key governance policies which pose potential benefits or barriers to MO success and make recommendations for improvement;
  • Communicate and promote adoption of best practices in Board governance to continually strengthen leadership from the MOs to the World Board;
  • Plan and oversee preparations for governance aspects of Regional and World Conferences, including development of conference Rules of Procedure and training and guidance of Procedural Teams;
  • Offer advice and support for board orientation and development throughout the Movement;
  • Monitor Committees’ and Working Groups’ compliance with Terms of Reference and recommend changes to processes and practices based on these observations.
  •  

    Members:

    Jayne Wachira (Kenya) (Chair)
    Katerina Agorogianni (Greece)
    Helene Gestrin (Sweden)
    Fiona Bradley (New Zealand)
    Deborah del Duca (Canada)
    Jillian van Turnout (Ireland)
    Candela Gonzalez (Argentina)
    Ana María Mideros (Peru) (ex-officio)
    Tashia Batstone (Canada) (ex-officio)
    David Coe (ex-officio)
    Staff lead: Clare Parry

    Governance Workshop

    I was honoured to train the Board of Aidlink Ireland. It is great to see the passion, diligence and rigour it brings to its work. And very happy with the feedback on Twitter:

    “Many thanks to @JillianvT and @CarmichaelCntr for an excellent workshop with @AidlinkIreland board of directors today on governance and effectiveness. Challenging, relevant & current.”

    10:22 AM – 27 Jan 2018

    Jillian van Turnhout receives INSEAD Certificate in Corporate Governance

    I recently completed my INSEAD International Directors Programme and was honoured to receive my Certificate. This further strengthens my Corporate Governance experience, enabling me to serve companies as an effective member of their supervisory boards or help them review their governance structure and/or processes. 

    The INSEAD Certificate in Corporate Governance (IDP-C) is a global credential for board members operating internationally

    The International Directors Programme is INSEAD’s flagship course in corporate governance that aims to develop effective directors for the global business scene. Today’s supervisory boards have to contend with a host of new pressures, challenges and risks in addition to evaluating the performance of the CEO and senior executives. They must therefore set the company’s strategic direction, often across diverse product markets and geographies, and monitor the firm’s risk profile.

    Set within an international context that is unique in director education, the programme offers practical and tested frameworks and tools to sharpen judgment and decision-making skills. It also augments the oversight abilities of directors seeking to boost their existing competencies or to be better prepared for new board mandates. It enables its graduates to master strategies for the following fundamental areas: board effectiveness and dynamics; board decision-making and oversight; and director effectiveness and development.

    About INSEAD

    INSEAD is one of the world’s leading and largest graduate business schools. INSEAD offers participants a truly global educational experience. With campuses in Europe (France), Asia (Singapore) and Middle East (Abu Dhabi), and alliances with top institutions, INSEAD’s business education and research spans around the globe. Our 145 renowned faculty members from 40 countries inspire more than 1,400 students in our degree and PhD programmes. In addition, more than 11,000 executives participate in INSEAD’s executive education programmes each year.

    INSEAD’s innovative programmes are internationally recognised. Of particular note, the Financial Times has ranked INSEAD as the #1 MBA programme in the world for two years in a row (2016 & 2017).

    My graduation

    Below you can see two collages of the ceremony at which I received my Certificate.


     

    Contact Me

    Jillian van Turnhout, Candidate, WAGGGS World Board

    Follow the links to view the letter of support by
    the Council of Irish Guiding Associations of Jillian van Turnhout‘s candidacy
    for the World Board of the
    World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS)

    bit.ly/JvTCandidateWAGGGSWBArabic Arabic – عربى 

    English: bit.ly/JvTCandidateWAGGGSWBEnglish

    Français – French: bit.ly/JvTCandidateWAGGGSWBFrench

    Español – Spanish: bit.ly/JvTCandidateWAGGGSWBSpanish

    Open Letter to Government calling for release of 1926 Census of Ireland

    14 July 2016

    Dear Taoiseach, Enda,

    It is great to see the 2016 Census data released – and I know this is only top level figures. However, it reminded me of the quest for information by genealogists around Ireland and the World to trace our family lines.   I am baffled why the Central Statistics Ireland (CSO) will not allow the release of the 1926 Census information.   I am writing to you as I understand from the 1993 Statistics Act the CSO comes under your remit (or can be delegated).

    The law to bring in the 100-year rule to lock records was introduced as part of the Statistics Act 1993 and even then a commitment was given to the Seanad to reduce the lock to 70 years.  Every attempt to change the law since has been blocked.  You made a commitment to release the records in your 2011 Programme for Government and yet, each attempt to change the law to allow for the release of records was blocked. The 1926 Census would be a powerful genealogical tourism tool. For us family historians it would be wonderful to track each part of our family line between the 1911 census and 1926 census during this period of Irish history.

    Using myself as a case study in point. You know me as Jillian van Turnhout, my family name is Hassett.My Dadabt 1930 John Francis Hassett and Mary Catherine Foley my Grandparents, Michael Hassett was the fifth of six children. His parents (photo to the right) married in Dublin in 1930. My Dad, Michael was born in 1936 in Dingle, Co. Kerry.  His mother, Mary Catherine Foley was born in 1905 in Cromane, Co. Kerry and she died in Ballintemple, Cork, in their then family home, in December 1944. His father, John Francis Hassett born in 1904 in Glin, Co. Limerick grew up in Knockanean, near Ennis, Co. Clare.  John Francis died in February 1945 after an accident on his bike. My Dad was only 8 years of age when he lost both his parents within 3 months.

    On a side note, my Dad recounts when his father John Francis had the bicycle accident and ended up in hospital.  My Dad always says he remembers being the happiest he had been in his life the day his father was due out of hospital.   He knows this was a strange thing to say as he had only lost his mother less than 3 months beforehand but they had got such a fright after their Dad’s accident they were ecstatic as children to hear he was coming out of hospital.   I can’t imagine what it was like for them to hear the devastating news that their Dad died on the morning he was due home.  Only in recent years I got a copy of the inquest report from 1945 and was able to tell my Dad that his father died of a brain injury most likely caused by an undetected hairline fracture.

    Dad was fortunate that his Aunty Helen moved to their then home in Beaumont, Ballinabt 1947 Dad Michael Hassett with his 5 siblings in Cromanetemple, Cork to look after him and his five siblings (photo from about 1947) including his older brothers Tom, and Sean and baby brother Liam who would still like to know more about their parents’ history.   My Dad, as you know, died last November and I am still on the trail of his parents and their ancestors through available records and newspaper cuttings.  I know the 1926 census would provide such rich data and add to our knowledge and yet these records are ‘sealed’ until January 2027.

    I can access the 1940 US Census, the 1939 Register of England and Wales, the 1920 Canadian Census but alas not the 1926 Census of Ireland.  The 1950 US Census will be released in 2022 – 5 years before Ireland releases the 1926 Census.   And before you ask, the information in the 1926 Census comprises of forename, surname, age, marital status, relationship to head of household, religion, occupation and townland where born, employer, if unemployed normal profession – and so I wonder why the need for secrecy.  Why can’t the 1926 Census be released?  My Dads three brothers are currently aged between 73 and 81 years.  The 1926 could potentially fill in important gaps of where was their mother and father in the years before they married in 1930.  It is absurd that we have to wait until 2027 to access this information?  The story of my family history is just one of countless who hunger for information on their identity and roots not to mention the benefits to tourism a release of this nature will attract.

    I call on you to bring in amending legislation to allow for access to this vital genealogical tool, the 1926 Census of Ireland.  I am, of course, at your service if I can be of any assistance in furthering this cause.

    Yours sincerely

    Jillian van Turnhout

    April 2016 – My final newsletter

    Please click below to access my final Newsletter and find out more about the contributions I’ve been making and events I’ve been attended, both inside and outside the Oireachtas:

    April 2016 Newsletter